Shelter Cove Marina - October 2009 Newsletter
February 2016 - Marine eNewsletter
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Shelter Cove Marina
2240 Shelter Island Dr.
San Diego, Ca. 92106

Telephone:
619-224-2471

Fax:
619-224-9117

E-mail Address:
info@sheltercove
marina.com


Web Site:
www.sheltercove
marina.com

Office Hours:
Monday - Sunday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Harbor Police:
619-686-6272

US Coast Guard:
800-424-8802


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YachtSource


From the Marina Office
Greetings Shelter Cove Mariners - Here is your February 2016 marina newsletter.

In this month's newsletter, we have some expert opinions on the dos and don'ts of buying a boat, and for those of you selling your boat, a checklist for how to prepare for that all important sea trial.

For you avid anglers, we have a brand new monthly article featuring some useful fishing tips.

In the "know before you go" department, we talk about how to be sure that "all systems are also go". Lastly, since it's Winter and we're all trying to stay warm and cozy aboard our boats, some reminders of how to avoid dangerous carbon monoxide poisoning.

The Staff at Shelter Cove Marina
info@sheltercovemarina

Mark's "Fish 'n Tips" - Taking the (Right) Bait!
- By Mark Moffat
Choosing the proper bait can make all the difference between a bummer of a fishing trip and a memorable experience. In this month's column, we'll talk about the proper selection and use of one of the most common types of bait - live sardines.

On most half-day and multi-day fishing trips you'll want to take along some sardines to use for bait.

When selecting sardines, take a look at their color. What you are looking for are those that have absolutely no red color. They should be green, and of those, choose those that have the darkest shade of green.

You'll also want to select sardines that have a nice covering of scales. (Bald sardines are apparently less appetizing!). However, a bit of slime on the bait is apparently appetizing, so look for a those with a nice gel coat.

Before selecting your bait, simply wet your hands in the hand well and rub them together. This helps in reducing scales coming off while handling the bait.

Lastly, when you're out there getting ready to bait your hook, look at the bait in the hand well. You'll notice that there are a few racing around that never hit the side of the well. Those are the ones you want.

That's it for me this month - Next time we'll talk about techniques for baiting the hook. Happy Fishing!

Mark Moffat is a fire-fighter by trade, a member of the San Diego Yacht Club and is a life-long fisherman by avocation. He started working the half-day boats as a pinhead at age 10; migrating to the full day Albacore boats at age 14.

Today , Mark is the Charter Master of an annual two week long range trip on the Red Rooster 3. Click Here to learn more about the Red Rooster 3 and Mark's annual trip.

   

Christian Marine Surveyors

The Sea Trial - Would Your Boat Pass or Fail?
- By Bob Sherman
Certainly we would all like to think the answer would be "yes". However, it is surprisingly common to have issues arise during a sea trial, and occasionally some are deal breakers.
Usually it's the result of overdue, deferred maintenance. But sometimes even repairable issues are enough to scare off the prospective buyer. They may be able to laugh about it later, but no one will be happy if the boat gets towed back by Vessel Assist!

Put yourself in the Buyer's shoes. If it's a first-time buyer, they are making a big jump to purchase a yacht, both mentally and financially. They will expect the boat to have all the boat's main systems functioning properly.

If the boat looks nice cosmetically, the expectation is that it has been properly maintained mechanically as well. It is relatively common to have overdue bottom paint, or minor cosmetic issues like buff & wax, or canvas, but when it comes to engines, buyers will get nervous with a lot of red flags.

The most common issue we see as Brokers is a clogged cooling system. Salt water cools the heat exchanger, and on powerboats, also the transmission cooler, and turbocharger-aftercooler. It is best to follow the engine manufacturer's recommended interval for cleaning these components, which are usually 3 to 5 years.

We often see boats that have not had cooling systems cleaned in 5 to 7 years. At normal cruise RPM the engine temps may be near normal. However, the mechanical test-run during the sea trial usually includes a few minutes at full throttle.

If these components are clogged, the engines will overheat and the alarm buzzer may sound. Imagine how the buyer will feel when this happens, regardless of the explanation! Even if the seller steps up to take care of the issue, the buyer will now be suspicious and uncomfortable, and it may only take a couple minor issues to scare him or her off completely.

Even if the engines do not overheat, a clogged cooling system will cause dangerous back-pressure on hoses. If one bursts or pops loose, salt water will be sprayed everywhere, and the engine could quickly and catastrophically overheat. Not pretty.

It is always a good idea to have a mechanic check your engines annually, but especially before a major trip or when listing the boat for sale. If they see any "red flags" that would come up on survey, it is better to take care of them now, to make sure the boat sails through the sea trials with flying colors.

Other issues that we often see are abnormal vibrations from the running gear, marginal functioning of the steering system, weak or dead batteries, and frozen anchor windlasses.

Test out and exercise all your boat's equipment on a regular basis. Again, if you use your boat regularly and/or maintain it properly, none of these things should crop up.

But when the decision is made to sell a boat, it is probably not getting the attention that is used to. It makes sense to pre-sea trial your boat with the listing Broker to see what works and what does not. They can advise you on what to fix, what to replace, and what to leave alone.

Bob Sherman has over 28 years of Yacht sales experience and is the owner of YachtSource. He is also qualified to instruct on all vessel types, and has held 100-ton Captain's license since 1982. He is an avid sailor, and scuba diver. You can send an e-mail to Bob at bobsherman@BlueSkyNews.com

The only treatment for carbon monoxide poisoning is to replace the carbon monoxide in the victim's blood with oxygen.

At a minimum, the victim will have to breathe high concentrations of oxygen for a long time to reverse the poisoning. In worst case scenarios, victims must be treated in barometric chambers, which provide 100% oxygen in high-pressure environments.

Carbon Monoxide poisoning is 911 time. Get help immediately! Perform CPR for one minute before calling 911 if you are alone. Otherwise, have someone else call and begin CPR.

Get the Person to Fresh Air - Move the person away from carbon monoxide area. If the person is unconscious, check for injuries before moving.

Turn off carbon monoxide source if you can do so safely.

Mild exposure is treated with oxygen and monitoring of carbon monoxide levels. Severe carbon monoxide poisoning may require high doses of oxygen therapy.

Bob Simons ImageBob Simons has been in the Coast Guard Auxiliary for over thirty years and owns a sailboat as well as a powerboat. He teaches classes in Boating Safety & Seamanship as well as Basic and Advanced Coastal Navigation. Bob is also the co-developer of the Sirius Signal S-O-S light and co-owner of Seabreeze Books and Charts

Nautical Book Corner
Mariner's Guide to Nautical Information
- by Priscilla Travi
This alphabetically arranged reference work puts over 2,000 modern nautical topics and terms at your fingertips, with enough explanatory advice to be truly useful. Topics ranging from the Navigation Rules, cruising under sail and power, electronics, and communication, to safety, weather, technical topics, and commonly-used spoken nautical language make this book a comprehensive resource. The Topic Index helps you test your knowledge and learn more about a subject, and the extensive annotated bibliography identifies hundreds of relevant publications and Internet resources. These terms are illustrated with 173 color photographs and 11 line drawings. If you are thinking about getting started on the water this book is for you. If you are already out there and dreaming about distant horizons, there is a wealth of information to help you become more competent, confident, and comfortable afloat. Price: $35.00

The Complete Stupid Boat Tricks
- by Bruce Jenvey
Here are the stories of New Guy Navigator, Captain Crunch, and Dr. X. There are incidents with drawbridges, boat trailers, and flare guns (devices designed to embarrass and befuddle us). And tales of endurance under adverse condition like motors that go into business for themselves, marine toilets that explode and barbecued sacrifices to the gods. Only the names have been changed to protect the guilty. Price: $14.95

The Dangerous Book for Boaters
- by Marlin Bree
A good-humored guide to the many idiosyncrasies of boats and boaters. This offbeat guide explains topics such as how to use the head, understanding marine dress codes and etiquette, surviving seasickness, and perfecting the art of romance while at sea. This all-in-one guide will amuse and enlighten landlubbers wishing to understand the waterfront scene and will give crusty seadogs a boatload of laughs. Price: $8.69

What Do You "Really" Know About Your On-Board Systems?
- By Captain H.G. "Rags" Laragione - President
O.K., Picture this. You're cruising to Fantasy Island, and all of a sudden your GPS system goes down. But aha! - No problem! You are a seasoned skipper and you are prepared for just such and incident because you have a backup hand-held GPS on board!

But Uh-Oh! You haven't turned it on since you bought it a few years ago, and beside the fact that you forgot how to use it, it's dead too! - And you didn't bring any backup batteries for it!

Well, don't feel alone! - These things happen to the best of us, but hopefully this article will stimulate some actions items for you to consider so you can "know before you go" on your next voyage.

In addition to the obvious like checking to see if you have enough fuel and fresh water on board, here's just a few other items to check out before you head out:

  • Is there enough propane or liquid natural gas in the tanks?

  • Is your boat's bottom clean - a dirty bottom means excess fuel usage.

  • Does your trip include a visit to a new marina? Make sure your zincs are in good condition.

  • How are your fire extinguishers - Are they charged and ready for action?

  • What's in your spare parts locker - Is it stocked with everything you might need - first aid kit up to date - updated required publications - spare impellers for your generator and other water pumps? Spare batteries? etc.

  • One of the most often causes for problems and panic at sea occurs when a skipper does not know what to do if there is a failure of an electric or electronic system. When we are training new captains at our maritime school, a big part or our at sea training involves teaching and simulating what to do in these circumstances.

  • On the electrical side of things, we stress the importance of knowing your electrical panel inside and out.

  • In the power category, we make sure the student understands the difference between the generator and the inverter, and which systems are powered and charged by each and when.

  • On the electronic side of things, we stress the importance of testing all electronic systems before you go (both hand-held and built in) because a very common mistake is to assume that an electronic system that was working the last time you used it is still working today. (Don't forget to test laptops, iPads, hand held radios, emergency signals, sat phones, etc. etc. etc.).

This is of course not a complete list of items to check out before you go - just some food for thought that might help you avoid an unpleasant experience on the water.

Captain Laragione is the President of The Maritime Institute which offers USCG approved courses for mariners. Curriculum ranges from the maritime rules of the road to the 1600 Ton Captain's License. Captain Laragione is well known for his motto - "The key to safe boating is education; so let's get educated!"

Tommy's Favorites - Dr. Sails Two Component Epoxy Based Adhesive
- By Tom Jarvis
Dr. Sails is a repair product that should be on everyone's vessel whether power or sail. This two part adhesive can be applied under water and cure under salt or fresh water.

It can be applied to carbon fiber, wood, fiber glass, wet suit material, sailcloth, steel and aluminum. This adhesive is fast curing, structural strong, flexible, and again completely submersible for underwater repairs.

What really gets my attention is that this product can be used to repair a torn sail while underway and remain flexible.

In the Barcelona World Race one of the vessels, Renault ZE, at 1,875 nautical miles from the finish line sustained a "scratch" in their main sail approximately 8 meters (26.2 feet) in length caused by a jibe in the middle of a storm.

In this race they can not receive outside assistance otherwise they will be disqualified. They used their 265 ml DrSails Adhesive Kit to repair the sail, and after twenty minutes were hoisting the repaired sail and back in the race. The balance of the flexibility, quick cure time, and the structural strength of the repair allowed them to continue racing even in sustaining winds of 50km/hour (31.02 miles/hour). The mainsail was never compromised and the sail did not have to be repaired again, allowing the Renault ZE to reach the finish line in third place.

In another race a vessel had a small pinhole leak in the aluminum hull below the waterline. By the time the leak was at a level to set the alarms off the needed repair area was underwater. With the use of DrSails Adhesive the crew applied a small aluminum rectangular piece to the hole and in twenty minutes the repair was completely sealed and the vessel continued the race with no more water intrusion.

There have been a number of companies that have developed two part epoxy repair for below the waterline. Several of them take a long time to cure and when cured they are very rigid and hard to sand. In fact some of the products are like sanding steel when it is cured. DrSails is so flexible and strong. It truly is an amazing product that should be on any vessel in the case of emergency you will have a very versatile and effective repair product.

On their website www.drsails.com there are a number of YouTube Videos showing you how to use the product and make actual repairs underway.

Tom Jarvis is the Vice President of the Board of Directors of the SuperYacht Association and he also performs outside Marketing and Sales for the San Diego Marine Exchange. Click Here to email your boating product questions to Tom.

   
Boating Apps
Now with all of us being connected to the internet via our smart phones, tablets, etc., we have put together some useful apps as well as a few crazy boating games. All of these apps can be downloaded from your iTunes Store account. The download links that we have supplied below are only from the iTunes Store and are safe to view.

Boating Log Book
Boat Docking - Maneuvering in Marinas
You have always wanted to know how to dock a boat? These techniques, as well as all other techniques are included in this interactive course. Maneuvering techniques can be viewed step by step by means of interactive films. Basics such as boat types, leeway, prop walk (wheel effect), also common rookie mistakes are explained. Price: $19.99 - Download Here

A professional and full-featured app for iOS that is designed to help you manage all aspects of your boating life. Now you have a single app to log your trips plus track your fuel, maintenance, expenses and manage your boat. It will even help you remember stuff with its handy To-Do and Shopping Lists! Price FREE - Download Here

BoatingBay - Boats For Sale
The BoatingBay app helps you find new and used boats for sale near you. Search thousands of boats by make, model, year, length and price. Every boat listing includes multiple photos with a detailed description. When you find the right boat, you can contact the seller immediately by phone or email. Price: FREE - Download Here

Boat Ramps
Boat Ramps from TakeMeFishing.org is an exciting new app that lets you quickly locate and get directions to more than 35,000 boat ramps throughout the U.S. Price: FREE - Download Here

"Should I Trust My Broker?" (Part 1)
- By Kells Christian
Having been asked this question repeatedly at our booth in the just concluded San Diego boat show and many times over the years, I decided to publish my answer to that question.

Since we are a marine survey company, the question we usually get from a prospective boat buyer naturally is "Can I trust my broker's recommendation for a marine surveyor?"

To use a baseball analogy, this is a "hanging curve ball" question in which I'm at bat with the bases loaded. Boat brokers and marine surveyors are often at odds and I have suffered the blows of many brokers' verbal bats.

Still, my answer is, "If you trust your broker, you should trust their recommendation for marine surveyor, lender, insurance company, boat yard, mechanic, etc.; - After all, you trust their advice on the boat, right?"

I ask if the potential boat buyer is working with a broker that found the boat for them or if they found the boat and the broker came along, becoming their broker and also the broker for the seller. This doesn't necessarily disqualify the broker's referrals, but the new relationship will not manifest the same trust as one developed over time with someone searching listings for you and taking you out for viewings.

I see no ethical dilemma in brokering both sides of the deal - it is common, and the broker either is or is not ethical. Of course having one broker versus two creates some ethical challenges and raises the possibility of an appearance of a conflict of interest. It must be tricky to advise the buyer on a proper offering price when the broker already knows the seller's bottom line. A dedicated broker could logically be more aggressive in negotiating but the shared broker might have more influence.

If there is any question that the broker's referral(s) are not in your best interest, don't dismiss them, but also do your own research. The marine industry is a "small world", ask marine industry professionals for referrals. We all know each other's reputations. Network with marine surveyors, lenders, insurance agents, boat yard operators, mechanics and maritime attorneys.

Ask for several referrals instead of just one and compare the lists. Ask your boating neighbors and friends. Search the internet, but be careful to not be influenced by one fanatical supporter or detractor. "Due diligence" in this case does not take long and is simple.

On the other side of the coin, I just met with a repeat (marine survey) client of mine who had a bad sales experience as a boat seller, and realized many of our clients don't go through the vessel selling process often.

Next month in Part 2 of this article, I will share my experience on the boat selling transaction side, which I hope will be helpful.

Kells Christian has been an accredited Marine Surveyor since 1990. His expertise extends to both recreational and commercial vessels. Kells was Regional Director of Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors (SAMS) for 2 years and a prominent member of numerous other industry organizations. You can e-mail your marine surveyor questions to kells@themarinesurveyors.com or Click Here to visit his web site.

Do You Recognize These Symptoms?
- By Bob Simons
There is a very real danger of Carbon Monoxide (CO) accumulation in our boats during the winter months when we tend to have our boats more or less closed up to retain the warmth.

Carbon Monoxide is a gas produced by burning any and all kinds of fuel. Running your boat's engine or generator can cause Carbon Monoxide to accumulate in the living and sleeping spaces, as can propane use, natural gas use, etc.

You can't see, smell, or taste carbon monoxide. But if you breathe too much of it, it can become deadly within minutes.

Whether winter or summer, be aware that the following symptoms in yourself or others may be an indicator or warning of carbon monoxide poisoning:

  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Shortness of breath
  • Weakness or Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Unstable gait (stumbling around)
  • Nausea & vomiting
  • Unconsciousness

The only treatment for carbon monoxide poisoning is to replace the carbon monoxide in the victim's blood with oxygen.

At a minimum, the victim will have to breathe high concentrations of oxygen for a long time to reverse the poisoning. In worst case scenarios, victims must be treated in barometric chambers, which provide 100% oxygen in high-pressure environments.

Carbon Monoxide poisoning is 911 time. Get help immediately! Perform CPR for one minute before calling 911 if you are alone. Otherwise, have someone else call and begin CPR.

Get the Person to Fresh Air - Move the person away from carbon monoxide area. If the person is unconscious, check for injuries before moving.

Turn off carbon monoxide source if you can do so safely.

Mild exposure is treated with oxygen and monitoring of carbon monoxide levels. Severe carbon monoxide poisoning may require high doses of oxygen therapy.

Bob Simons ImageBob Simons has been in the Coast Guard Auxiliary for over thirty years and owns a sailboat as well as a powerboat. He teaches classes in Boating Safety & Seamanship as well as Basic and Advanced Coastal Navigation. Bob is also the co-developer of the Sirius Signal S-O-S light and co-owner of Seabreeze Books and Charts

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