Shelter Cove Marina - October 2009 Newsletter
November 2015 - Marine eNewsletter
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Shelter Cove Marina
2240 Shelter Island Dr.
San Diego, Ca. 92106

Telephone:
619-224-2471

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619-224-9117

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marina.com


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From the Marina Office
By the time you're reading this Shelter Cove Marina October newsletter, marina manager Greetings Shelter Cove Mariners - Here is your November 2015 BlueSkyNews boating newsletter.

In this issue, we bring you the straight scoop on California's long debated (and some say long awaited) new Boating Education Law - and when and what the new law will mean to you if your vessel has an engine.

In the South of the Border topic, we have information about Mexico's recent computerization of its Temporary Import Permit (TIP) files, and the importance of making sure your previous vessel owner does not still have an open permit.

Also in this issue, we have a maintenance tip regarding your engine motor mounts; a list of important phone numbers every San Diego boater should have on board, and a fun look at how to "right-size" your galley provisions for that upcoming cruise.

That's it for us - We hope you are enjoying the cooler breezes of Fall and looking forward to the holiday season.

The Staff at Shelter Cove Marina
info@sheltercovemarina



California Institutes New Legal Requirements for the Operation of Recreational Motor Boats
On January 1, 2015, Senate Bill 941, better known as California's boating safety education requirement, will become law. SB941 requires that vessel operators pass a boating education test and obtain a Vessel Operator Card ("VOC") in order to operate a vessel that is propelled by an engine on California waterways. California joins a list of many other states with similar boating safety education requirements already in place.

The program will be phased in over the next several years, with the first mandatory requirement for card carrying compliance to begin on January 1, 2018 for certain age groups (20 years of age and younger). By 2025, all persons operating engine propelled vessels in California will be required to have a VOC. There will be some exemptions to the VOC requirement including:

  • Non-residents temporarily operating a vessel in California for less than 60 days who meet the boating requirements, if any of their state;

  • Residents of countries other than the United States temporarily operating a vessel in California for less than 60 days who meet the boating requirements, if any, of their resident country;

  • A person operating a vessel while under the direct supervision of a person 18 years of age or older who is in possession of a California VOC issued by the Department of Boating and Waterways;

  • A person operating a vessel in an organized regatta or vessel race, or water ski race;

  • A person operating a rental vessel;

  • A person who is in possession of a current commercial fishing license;

  • A person in possession of a valid marine operator license (USCG or STCW78);

  • A person who has successfully completed a boating course approved by the Commission on Peach office Standards and Training.

The California Department of Boating and Waterways is currently in the process of determining what courses will be approved and qualify a participant for a VOC upon successful completion. Once issued a California VOC will remain valid for the operator's lifetime.

For more information, Click Here.

Some "Sound" Advice
D
id you know? Every vessel less than 65.6 ft. (20 meters) in length is required by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry an efficient sound producing device.

Your sound producing device can be a mouth-, hand-, or power-operated whistle or horn, or some other means to make an efficient sound signal (No vessel may be equipped with a siren, however, except vessels used by law enforcement officers).

This is a requirement on all waters, and it must be audible for one-half mile.

Vessels 65.6 feet or more in length are required to carry on board a whistle or horn, and a bell.

In periods of reduced visibility or whenever a vessel operator needs to signal his or her intentions or position, a sound-producing device is essential.

The navigation rules for meeting head-on, crossing, and overtaking situations are also examples of when sound signals are required.

Are you the skipper of your boat? If you're caught in the fog and you hear an approaching vessel sound one short blast or two short blasts, do you know what it means? And do you know what you're supposed to do to respond?

If you're not completely familiar with these U.S. Coast Guard rules, Click Here to familiarize yourself before you go out on your next cruise.

It's Boating! - Not Camping!
- By Richard Benscoter
My wife has the philosophy that preparing for meals on our sailboat should not be like getting ready for roughing it on a camping trip in a tent. She prefers to have a little more luxury and creature comforts in the galley when we're cruising.

Heeding that philosophy, we always keep her philosophy in mind when we prepare our boat for our next cruise.

First, for dinner, we have broken the cardinal rule of cruisers. We have porcelain dinnerware on our boat - no paper plates or plastic knives and forks. (Before you ask, we have only broken one desert plate in our 16 years of sailing in some not too cool weather.)

We approach having a nice dinner setting as part of our boating experience, and also something you can enjoy and be able to share with friends and other boaters.

Second, since space is always a premium on any sailboat, everything you stock in the galley should be something that is required for meal preparation; have multiple functions; is compact; and of course, no need to break the bank to acquire it.

To save space, we have a 7 piece 18/10 stainless steel nested cookware set with an aluminum core and ceramic coating. (a word of caution - be sure to measure your stove and determine if you can use two items together and that they will also fit into the oven when using a roaster.

We also have nesting bakeware, but again, make sure it fits in your oven. To prevent rust while storing, a light dusting of cooking spray after use will do the trick.

For space saving utensils, stainless steel flatware, mixing bowls, and all the other galley accessories you need, we recommend a trip to your neighborhood IKEA.

One of my great pleasures is having a great meal on your boat while enjoying what nature has to offer. Think about it - It's Boating! - Not Camping!

See you on the water,

Richard Benscoter
Editor's Note: Richard Benscoter is a long time avid sailor. He and his wife Debbie are both avid sailors and members of the Silver Gate Yacht Club and owner of the Mariners Woodshop. If you have a sailing question for Richard, send e-mail to richard@BlueSkyNews.com.

Some Important Phone Numbers Every San Diego Boater Should Have Handy On Board
- By Bob Simons
If an emergency or a need for assistance arises while you're out on the water, the last thing you want to worry about is how to find the phone number you need fast.

This is just a reminder to create your own personal list of emergency phone numbers and keep it handy on board your vessel whether your at the dock or out on a cruise. For convenience, you should also add the phone numbers of family members and your other vessel service providers like your mechanic, boat yard, communications, and electronics company representatives.

Here's a few important numbers to get you started- Safe Boating:
.
.

Bob Simons ImageBob Simons has been in the Coast Guard Auxiliary for over thirty years and owns a sailboat as well as a powerboat. He teaches classes in Boating Safety & Seamanship as well as Basic and Advanced Coastal Navigation. Bob is also the co-developer of the Sirius Signal S-O-S light and co-owner of Seabreeze Books and Charts

.Mexico's Temporary Import Tempest
- By Capt. Elizabeth Shanahan
Since 2014, when I wrote an article regarding the current status of the Temporary Import Permits (TIP) in Mexico, there have been numerous updates to the TIP system. The main change is that it is now computerized, as is most of Mexico.

This is a follow-up to my original article because of the numerous updates to the now computerized TIP system offices.

The basics are still the same. You apply for a TIP either online or at your first point of entry to Mexico. Or you may do so through an agent. You should find out quickly if you have any open TIPs on the boat and if you have an issue that needs to be dealt with.

All boats that ever had a TIP are now in the computer system. And cases have surfaced recently in which, for example, a person purchased a boat in Southern California, but the former boat owner (and seller) didn't cancel his TIP. Perhaps he forgot to cancel it, or lost it etc. But when a new owner applies for a TIP they cannot complete the process if the prior owner, (or 2 or 3 owners back) never canceled the TIP.

That's the bad news. The good news is there is a process to get this cleared up. It's not scary but it is time consuming. If you are selling your boat it's very important for you to cancel your TIP when you leave Mexico.

First, see if you can locate the original TIP with all the required back up from the seller or prior owner. If you have the original and all the back up data (the 8 ½" x 11" equipment list) that was issued with the TIP you can simply walk into Banjecito and cancel it. While you are there be sure to get a full TIP history on your boat. It has happened where the seller of a boat canceled his or her TIP but the owner prior to them did not.

If you bought a boat and have an issue, go to your first point of entry into Mexico with a certified copy of your bill of sale, a current document – and a large amount of patience. But you will need to go to Banjercito and get a history (or status) of the TIP for your particular vessel. Then you will have to go to the Ministerio Publico (Public Minister) and file a report that the prior TIP has been lost by the prior owner. Next you have to notify customs (Aduana) with the report from the Public Minister.

Again, be patient. Aduana may or may not go to the boat and verify the hull number, document number and any other identifying information. Then you will need to return to Banjercito with the reports. At that point you should be able to cancel all old TIPs and get your current TIP.

Try to remember through all this that you are not in the USA. Always be respectful to the authorities. We are, after all, guests in their country. Mexico allows us 10 years on our temporary import of a non-Mexican flagged vessel with no tax other than the cost of the permit.

The United States is not so generous, nor are most other countries if you are a foreign flagged vessel.

Captain Elizabeth Shanahan is an expert captain and yacht manager. She has delivered motor yachts, sailboats and powerboats around the world. She is a fully licensed Master, 200 Ton, with sail and auxiliary towing endorsements; and she is also a marine surveyor and project manager., You can email her to captaineliz@gmail.com or visit her website at www.e2yachtservices.com.

Your Engine Motor Mounts - An Often Overlooked Potential Problem
- By Kells Christian
As a marine surveyor, I occasionally encounter problems with motor mounts, and I wondered if there was a more analytic (and less subjective) way to determine their condition. I spoke with several experienced marine mechanics, a distributor and a manufacturer.

The vulcanized rubber in flexible or soft motor mounts provides sound and vibration dampening. It is this rubber that is most commonly damaged.

Apparently, a visual inspection is the only way to determine the condition of the rubber in the mounts. One mechanic mentioned using a durometer, but he had never used one. Petroleum products, heat and age cause damage to the rubber. The metal is most commonly damaged by corrosion.

Mounts also suffer damage from improper installation, under-sizing, hard shifting, groundings and hard landings (for those of you with boats that fly). Separation of the rubber from the metal, sagging and distortion are the usual indications of damaged rubber. High performance boats and some older yachts use solid mounts, with no dampening rubber.

Occasionally we find broken motor mount studs; a much more definitive indication of a problem mount. Amazingly of all of the broken studs we have found, none of the operators were aware of a problem as the other three mounts supported the engine load.

We commonly find the "jam nuts" not properly secured against the adjustment nut. If there are two nuts on one side of the engine's mounting flange, they should be touching.

So the next time you are "messing about" we encourage you to inspect your boat's motor mounts. Some may need a mirror and a flashlight. Inspect the rubber, the stud, the nuts and the bolts securing the mounts to the engine bearer. Damage claims involving catastrophic motor mount failures are few, but they usually include significant water intrusion about the propeller shaft seal and chaos. A brief check of mounts along with your normal pre-start check may prevent something much more catastrophic.

Replacement mounts and/or mount parts are available from engine manufacturers and sometimes only from the OEM$. The largest US based motor mount manufacturers are Barry Controls and Bushings, Inc. While there are no age specifications for motor mount life expectancy from the engine or motor mount manufacturers, the military specifications for many marine motor mounts is seven years.

The bad news - there is no objective inspection or test for motor mounts. The good news is if you keep the mounts clean and free of shock loads, they may outlast you.

Kells Christian has been an accredited Marine Surveyor since 1990. His expertise extends to both recreational and commercial vessels. Kells was Regional Director of Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors (SAMS) for 2 years and a prominent member of numerous other industry organizations. You can e-mail your marine surveyor questions to kells@themarinesurveyors.com or Click Here to visit his web site.

Christian Marine Surveyors

California Institutes New Legal Requirements for the Operation of Recreational Motor Boats
On January 1, 2015, Senate Bill 941, better known as California's boating safety education requirement, will become law. SB941 requires that vessel operators pass a boating education test and obtain a Vessel Operator Card ("VOC") in order to operate a vessel that is propelled by an engine on California waterways. California joins a list of many other states with similar boating safety education requirements already in place.

The program will be phased in over the next several years, with the first mandatory requirement for card carrying compliance to begin on January 1, 2018 for certain age groups (20 years of age and younger). By 2025, all persons operating engine propelled vessels in California will be required to have a VOC. There will be some exemptions to the VOC requirement including:

  • Non-residents temporarily operating a vessel in California for less than 60 days who meet the boating requirements, if any of their state;

  • Residents of countries other than the United States temporarily operating a vessel in California for less than 60 days who meet the boating requirements, if any, of their resident country;

  • A person operating a vessel while under the direct supervision of a person 18 years of age or older who is in possession of a California VOC issued by the Department of Boating and Waterways;

  • A person operating a vessel in an organized regatta or vessel race, or water ski race;

  • A person operating a rental vessel;

  • A person who is in possession of a current commercial fishing license;

  • A person in possession of a valid marine operator license (USCG or STCW78);

  • A person who has successfully completed a boating course approved by the Commission on Peace Officer's Standards and Training.

The California Department of Boating and Waterways is currently in the process of determining what courses will be approved and qualify a participant for a VOC upon successful completion. Once issued a California VOC will remain valid for the operator's lifetime.

For more information, Click Here.

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